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These 3 Companies Leverage Tech in the Right Ways

Tech Companies that Leverage Modern Technology

We live in a tech world, and there is a difference between having technology, and properly leveraging it in the most effective ways.

 

We’re inspired by lofty goals and ambitious undertakings. After all, when people take on problems bigger than themselves, they propel all of us—as a species—forward. For these reasons, we’ve been contemplating the organizations which are making the biggest impact on today’s world, and which we’d bet on for tomorrow’s.

 

Our top three are as follows:

 

Facebook —

For years, Facebook has been reinventing the way we connect and interact with others—in some visible ways, and in many behind the scenes. Your newsfeed, for instance, is designed specifically around your activity; content that seems to engage you more often is brought front and center, while content you’re likely to scroll past eventually stops showing up as frequently. The result is stronger, more sustainable engagement with your interests and loved ones.

 

For 2016, however, the company’s big news rotates around virtual reality, as Oculus (a Facebook-owned company) debuts a consumer platform. While the company has only released broad strokes information about its vision for the future, we know that 3D, controllable video and gaming is already available. And, with its control over the social sphere, it’s a small jump to suggest that new, digital meeting spaces are on their way. Such a change would dramatically shift the way we connect with others, and could even solve issues such as global gridlock, transportation pollution, and overcrowded metropolitan centers.

 

Amazon — 

Amazon has boldly decreed that drone delivery is coming, with more news out over the past week. Such drones, they note, will be capable of delivering a 5 lb package within 30 minutes, and can be managed from over 10 miles away. Of course, outside of quickly delivering trinkets for consumers, the technology they’re building has global implications for issues such as disaster relief (in areas where cars and planes can’t help), and for failing (or missing) infrastructure in poverty-stricken areas.

 

These announcements aren’t much of a surprise to those following the company, however; Amazon—despite being labeled as a “retailer”—spent $10 billion on R&D in 2014—more even than Apple did that year.

 

Google/Alphabet — 

A lot of what happens at Google is a secret. And, if you follow the news, you’ll see a laundry list of acquisitions over the past 5 years—from robotics, to artificial intelligence, to augmented reality — they are the paragon example of powerful tech leverage. With such an enormous spectrum of resources—and such lofty goals—there’s a good chance they’re going to “wow” us with big news in the near future.

 

But beyond these moonshot projects, we still rely on Google to help us make sense of the mind boggling amount of information on the web (and the insane volume of new content being shared every day). Their search algorithms—which are so important that entire marketing firms are dedicated to understanding them—ultimately determine what we see and when we see it. Without help from such programming, sorting valuable information from nonsense would be nigh impossible. In many ways, you could argue that search engines are the foundation for the entire information age.

 

To the people at these companies with big visions, and smart tech decisions, we thank you—and we hope your work continues to go well! We’ll be watching.

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