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The Wall Street Journal and Office Thermostat Wars

Wall Street Journal

Illustration by: JASON SCHNEIDER

 

The office thermostat wars are very much real. These conflicts can cause stress, headaches, along with company-wide discomfort. The Wall Street Journal’s Sue Shellenberger decided to outline this problem and provide the most tech-savvy solutions.

 

Janice from accounting is freezing. Ever since she clocked in at 9 a.m her mind drifted away from her workflow. The office seemed to get colder and colder. After an hour of braving the infinite chill with nothing but a cashmere sweater, Janice knew what to do: go directly into battle. She headed for the office thermostat.  Read more

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Your 2016 Tech Convention Calendar (1/2)

Tech Convention Calendar: Attend in 2016

We’ve often discussed the merits of staying on top of new technology, facility management trends, and innovation within the field. And, of course, there’s no better way to condense those goals into big gulps than via annual convention.

 

Here’s your comprehensive list for the first half of 2016: Read more

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CrowdComfort’s “Need to Read” Before 2016

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2016 is right around the corner. 

 

Our team here at CrowdComfort has hit some large milestones throughout 2015. These are instances of growth and improvement in all categories; one of those categories being thought leadership. Below is a list of all of CrowdComfort’s “must reads” before 2015 is over.  Read more

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Are Amazon’s “Dash Buttons” the Future of Restocking?

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Earlier this year, Amazon unveiled a new way to order goods via its massive online storefront: The Dash Button.

 

The concept is pretty simple: each Dash Button is WiFi enabled and associated with a single SKU on Amazon’s website. By clicking the dash button, you’ll place an order for said item and should receive it in a day or two. While Dash Buttons can be customized for virtually any product, they’re currently being marketed primarily for home goods (such as detergent and razor blades).

 

As facility managers, we can’t help but think there might be strong future applications for applying this technology toward office supplies. Doing so would solve a few problems:

  • Busy workers would be less likely to “forget” when they’ve seen low inventory (they could click to order right away)
  • Facility managers / office managers would be able to crowdsource (at least portions) of their inventory needs

 

According to Fortune, Amazon has already resolved the market’s concern over “multiple orders” (which would almost certainly preclude its potential for office implementation):

“The simplicity of one-button tasks are appealing, although it could lead to a mess of packages ending up at people’s doors if Amazon doesn’t try to minimize waste on its end, by grouping shipments together when possible. People on Twitter seem mostly concerned about pets and small children playing with the Dash Buttons and ordering multiples of their Kraft Macaroni and Cheese boxes, although Amazon notes that if the button is pressed more than once, the order doesn’t go through on the second time, and you’ll get a smartphone notification about it.”

 

Of course, applications for the Dash Button would depend on the availability (and competitive pricing) of goods via Amazon. But, for inexpensive, basic needs—such as coffee, copier paper, etc.—some companies may be willing to enable purchases to decrease the probability of being understocked, and to make employees feel more “at home” in their own offices.

 

We’ll be interested to see if Amazon feels the same way we do, and if they release more “enterprise-minded” options in 2016! More importantly, we’ll be looking for other companies to begin building “open needs” WiFi buttons, which could be used for virtually any purpose. Indeed, some consumers have already begun “hacking” the dash button for pretty creative uses.

 

This is a classic example of the Instant Enterprise Economy, where modern technology coincides with the desire for instantaneous services. As tech consumers, the CrowdComfort team believes that even more examples will come to light in the near future! 

 

What are you thinking about when it comes to the future of re-stocking? What other examples do you see of the “Instant Enterprise Economy?”

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“Tech to Expect:” Our Technology Predictions for 2016

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The past year has been a big one for tech. Rapid advancements in the world of technology spanned a number of different fields—from medicine, to space exploration, to consumer products like smartphones and tablets. As we look at 2016, there’s a great chance we’ll be seeing even more.

 

Here are our top predictions for “movers and shakers” in 2016: Read more

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An Energy Bar, Product News, And the Instant Economy

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Over the last few weeks, the CrowdComfort team has been getting excited for an event called “Energy Bar,” held at our current incubator, Greentown Labs.  While they hold several Energy Bars throughout the year, this was special for a variety of reasons, including that it was the last Energy Bar of 2015. We appreciate the support Greentown has provided us, and have our recap below.

 

Read more

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We raised $1.4 Million! Here’s a Recap

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Last week, the news came out that we raised over a million dollars in funding. The support we got from our friends was highly appreciated, as we have the following tweets, mentions, etc. to showcase the shoutouts we received! 

The reasons why we were able to hit this exciting milestone was highlighted during our initial coverage of the news. A million dollar idea has a lot of components, around a single and general concept. We appreciated all the support we have received, and are more than amped to continue to grow!  Read more

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CrowdComfort Raises $1.4 Million: Here’s Why

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Big news for us, we’ve raised over a million dollars!

In a press release picked up by BostInno, our CEO, Eric Graham, explained that fifteen angel investors added to an initial funding round of $300,000 towards CrowdComfort’s expansion. Here’s why:
Read more