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Rally the troops and gather the data with Executive Rounding

Executive Rounding

A great leader uses all of their tools and personnel to ensure success. Executive Rounding does just that: leveraging people and tech to gather powerful insights.

 

Alexander the Great.

George Patton.

John Blutarsky.

 

What did they have in common? They all knew how to rally the troops in order to get maximal benefit from their supporters. Even when challenges arose and the odds were against them, these masters of strategy could effectively and efficiently survey the field, while presenting the best possible plan — or at least one that got them out of Double-Secret Probation.

 

In today’s technology-driven world, nearly anyone can be an Alex, or George, or even a “Bluto.” Using geolocation and mapping technologies and your handy-dandy smartphone camera (which, for many, has become the primary option and purpose of purchasing/using a device), individual team members can survey the landscape, make and share comments, and spot, report, and deal with issues more effectively than ever.

 

We call this concept Executive Rounding.  Read more

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Improving The Human Sensor

 

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In the past few months, we’ve dug pretty deeply into the current value (and importance) of “The Human Sensor Network™.” But, as the year comes to an end and we set our sights for 2016, there’s still plenty of reasons to believe that The Human Sensor has room to grow.

 

Now, for clarity, we’re not talking about “improving” human beings. Instead, we’re simply considering ways in which emerging technology might create a more seamless approach to understanding what tenants want and need from their facility. Below is our “wish list” for 2016 on how to improve the input from a Human Sensor:

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“Smart Automation” builds Smart Management

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We have talked about the limits of automation in the world of facilities management in our last couple of posts about the topic. However, that doesn’t mean that automation doesn’t have a place in the world of facilities management. In fact, we believe that any automation, and similar technologies that utilize the internet of things, will improve the field of facilities management.

 

The case being that a symbiosis of tech and (human) touch will increase the overall improvement of facility managers’ work. Let’s dive in:  Read more

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Automated Systems aren’t Human Exclusive

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Today, most of us carry handheld devices that are orders of magnitude faster and more advanced than the computers which took us to the moon half a century ago. And, every day, these devices only get better at anticipating and fulfilling our needs.

 

As such—and because of our all-too-human propensity toward error—it should come as no surprise that we’re increasingly relegating a number of safety-related tasks to machines that have outpaced us in speed, reliability, and attention to detail. These reasons are why automated systems are gaining steam in all industries. However, a human touch and human intuition carries greater ethical decision making, that machines can’t make for us.  Read more

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“Automation” doesn’t equate to Automatic Safety

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It’s been over 100 years since the sinking of the Titanic, but we still retell the legendary ship’s story with great regularity—both for interest in the vessel’s feats of engineering, and for the tragedy of its untimely demise. But, in recounting this story, it’s impossible to avoid mention of the ship’s perceived “unsinkability,” as well as how this egotism led to an inadequate number of lifeboats and subsequent loss of human life.

 

In fact, one might argue that the Titanic’s story survived specifically because of its value as a cautionary tale.

 

Today, facility managers are thrust into roles not so different from those of the Titanic’s crew; both must define risks for those under their care and prepare for them as best they can. As we look at this comparison, an obvious question arises: has our technology made us overconfident, and—as a result—underprepared? Are we, for instance, less likely to enact company-wide fire drills because modern smoke detectors are so accurate that forewarning of a problem should provide us with enough time to evacuate? Read more